Company Outing

The Pittsburgh Limestone Corporation picnic

The Pittsburgh Limestone Corporation operated the quarry in Ganister that eventually became the Blue Hole. Every year, the quarrymen were treated to an outing. This photo, taken at some point prior to 1937, is from one of those outings.

I have not identified most people, but from left to right: Ed Guerin, Mike Wapner, two unknown men, Wasil Youchison, Mitro Karol, and then a whole bunch of unknown men.

8 thoughts on “Company Outing”

    1. Tom, unfortunately I do not know where the photo was taken. A pure guess would be somewhere near the quarries, but I cannot say with any certainty.

  1. I have looked closely at this image and only can identify my maternal grandfather, Ed Guerin. But at that time there would have been other family members that worked in the quarry, could have been there and not in the photo: Fred Levi Guerin ( son of Ed Guerin), Emmett Guerin ( brother of Ed Guerin), Scott Graham ( son-in-law of Ed Guerin , married to Mertie Guerin, Ed’s daughter) . About 1925, my parents lived in Ganister with Grandpa Ed Guerin and my dad, Norman Hickey, worked in the quarry for a year. He was married to Effie Guerin, Ed’s daughter.

      1. Hi, Brendan,
        The Guerins came from Erie County, PA. Grandpap Ed Guerin started working in a quarry there. He next moved to near Cambridge Springs, PA and worked in a quarry there. The company decided to open quarries in Ganister, sometime between 189o and 1895. They sent Grandpap Ed to open the quarries and be superintendent. Within a year or two, his brother, Emmett Guerin joined him and worked in the quarry. The quarry “office” is still standing and I think is being used as a storage building owned by a nearby house, over in St. Clair. My dad, Norman Hickey was from Erie. He was a second cousin to my mother, through Ed’s wife, Anna Sophia “Annie” Feasler. Mama, Effie Belle Guerin was born in one of the four white frame houses along the railroad tracks. Later they moved to the big brick house….Emmett lived in the brown frame double house…made from the railroad freight station. Scott Graham and Mertie Guerin Graham lived there, too. Later Fred Guerin and Paul Ross lived there. It is now a rest station for the rails to trails bike path. Anyway, Mama, Effie, met dad on a trip back to Erie to visit Annie’s family. Norman Hickey was from an Irish Hickey family from Erie and before that Buffalo, NY and Peterborogh Ontario Canada…originally Co. Cork, Ireland. More history for Ganister….About 1900, Ed Guerin’s parents ( Levi Guerin and Mary Jane Himebaugh) came to Ganister to live with Ed and Annie. Levi had been in the Civil War and used to put on his old uniform and march in parades on Fourth of July in Williamsburg. Ed, Annie, , Levi and Mary Jane are all buried in Presbyterian Cemetery in Williamsburg. About 1899, there was an epidemic of diphtheria in Ganister. Many got sick and some died. Ed and Annie Guerin lost two daughters: Ora Belle and Jannet Marie, age four and six, on the same day, one in the morning and one in the afternoon. There was great fear in the community about the disease and funeral director etc in Williamsburg would not come to help. Ed borrowed a wagon from a neighbor and went to Willaimsburg, bought two little caskets and drove home. They laid the little girls in the caskets and put them to the front window of the white frame house and neighbors filed by on the porch to pay respects. Then Ed drove the caskets to Williamsburg, dug two little graves in Methodist Cemetery and buried them, while Annie stayed home with children: Mertie, Elsie, Martha “Dot” and baby Fred. That house burned down after Guerins moved to the brick house. Mr. Skvir ( I am not sure of spelling) bought the brick house from the Guerins. He told me that later when he was a child there was another epidemic of diphtheria, but by then they knew what caused it. The doctor advised the whole town to boil drinking water and no one died. While Annie Guerin was not trained as a midwife, she would be called to all the quarry worker’s houses when a baby was to be born or someone was sick. She was there for the birth of most of the Ganister births in early days. She and Ed felt very close to the quarry worker’s families and felt responsible for their being there. Grandma Annie used to love receiving the beautiful Easter breads from St. Mary’s Easter celebration and shared with her by quarry worker’s wives. Ed Guerin and with the help of his daughter, Edna, was also the Postmaster for Ganister and St. Clair. Later others took over. There was a little white building in St. Clair that was the “post office “. This reminds me that Ed Guerin’s children grew up with the worker’s families and while the new immigrants were learning English, the Guerin kids learned the Slovic language of the immigrants! I remember going for mail with my mother, Effie, one time and she greeted and conversed fluently with her old friends who were there to get mail, too. Also, I went with her one time to visit an old lady who lived in one of the “Stone Row” houses. Mama spoke fluently with her and she enjoyed visiting this old friend who was the mother of children Mama went to school with. I have some photos of Ganister residents and buildings and the quarry that I need to scan and send to you, Brendan . Sorry for the long-winded ramblings, but now an old woman, memories come back to me.

    1. Elsie! I believe I am the Great, Great Granddaughter of Scott and Mertie…..Ethel Graham was my Great Grandmother. Can you tell me anything about them?? My Grandfather was Ethels only son, Raymond Creamer JR.

  2. First row squatting, ? Angelo Calderone ? Sure bears a strong family resemblance. Immigrant pre WW1!. Along with brother Mario Calderone, and wife Irene bore 2 sons and 2 daughters. Bertina, Arura, Carlo, Fernando. Moved to Boyers, Pa, Butler County, after WW1. Carlo passed in Gannister at a young age, buried in St Mary’s Cemetary. Actually !looking for Carlos plot to place a marker.
    Any help with this is appreciated. Paul Banjak, grandson of Mario, son of Bertina.

  3. I am fairly certain that the man standing in the center with a dark vest and pants is my grandfather, John Skvir.

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